Dennis2Dr. Dennis N. Crouse, BSc Biochemistry, – Harvard College, Ph.D. Organic Chemistry – Harvard University Chemistry Department, Post-graduate courses: Understanding Dementia – Wicking Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, and Fundamentals of Neuroscience – Harvard.

Of all the books read in college, three of them were most significant in shaping the author’s career: “Silent Spring” by Rachel Carson, “The Fitness of the Environment” by L. J. Henderson and “The Immense Journey” by Loren C. Eiseley. These books describe how our planet evolved to become an ideal environment for life and how our species, Homo sapiens, evolved to unwittingly upset this environment by introducing chemicals, such as DDT and aluminum.

After graduating from college the author co-founded a company to analyze the chemicals in food and water. In less than a year the company became the only company in New England approved by the FDA to analyze meat products for toxic chemicals, such as PCB’s and pesticides. The company tested and approved these meat products for sale to the public.

With his two business partners, Dr. Crouse purchased a company that produced isotopically labeled chemicals. Dr. Crouse, with the help of a group of talented chemists, developed a series of stable isotopically labelled toxic chemicals and pesticides that were sold and used worldwide for quantifying these chemicals in food and water.

Dr. Crouse developed the first computerized instruments to measure the corrosion rate of metals in contact with liquids. These rates are important when storing food and water in metal containers for long periods of time. These rates become even more important when cooking food in contact with metal surfaces, since heat usually increases the rate of metal corrosion.

Dr. Crouse, working with a dedicated group of people, helped develope a new type of detector for toxic and flammable gases. Thousands of these detectors were manufactured and continue to be manufactured. They are used by gas utility leak technicians for finding toxic and flammable gas leaks in the U.S., Canada, and Brazil. If you smell gas in or around your home and call the gas company, it is very likely they will arrive with one of these detectors to find the leak.